National Operating Standard

National Operating Standard – Case Study

Phased Roll Out Of Mandatory Telematics For Operators Within The Heavy Vehicle National Law

Australia’s Heavy Vehicle National Law should:

  • encourage and embrace the use of technology for safety and access purposes; and
  • ensure operators have suitable safety management systems in place and the capital necessary to ensure the safe operation of heavy vehicles.

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) believes these goals can be enhanced through the incorporation of a national operating standard for heavy vehicle operators into the Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL).

An important element of the standard would be a requirement for operators to collect and keep specified pieces of information using telemetric equipment and services compatible with standards and performance outcomes recognised through the National Telematics Framework.[1]

There are clear safety and productivity benefits in requiring the electronic collection of information.

The question is how best to roll out this requirement.

The answer is to do so in a phased manner.

The 2018 Motor Vehicle Census conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics[2] found that the following numbers of rigid trucks registered with an Australian motor vehicle registration authority was as follows:

Trucks with of gross vehicle mass (GVM) of under 4.5 tonnes

Trucks with a GVM between 4.5 – 8 tonnes

Trucks with a GVM between 8 and 12 tonnes

Trucks with a GVM between 12-20 tonnes

Trucks with  a GVM greater than 20 tonnes

TOTAL

158,032

77,539

95,460

67,960

106,007

504,998

 

One way of rolling out the proposed requirement would require:

  • fatigue-regulated heavy vehicles[3] to carry telemetric equipment compatible with standards recognised by the National Telematics Framework 12 months from the day legislation imposing the requirement commences;
  • vehicles between 8 and 12 GVM two years from the day the legislation imposing the requirement commences; and
  • vehicles between 4.5 and 8 GVM three years from the day the legislation imposing the requirement commences.

Conclusion

The creation of a National Operating Standard offers the opportunity to enhance the safety and productivity outcomes of heavy vehicle operators – key objectives of the HVNL.

The opportunity should be taken to make these amendments to the National Law and to make the legislation fit for the 2020s and beyond, in an environment where digital technologies and data will be an integral part of heavy vehicle operations.

 

 

[1] A digital business platform consisting of infrastructure and rules that support an open marketplace of telematics and related intelligent technology providers. For further information see: https://www.tca.gov.au/ntf/national-telematics-framework.

[2] https://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/9309.031%20Jan%202018?OpenDocument Table 7

[3] A motor vehicle or combination with a GVM of more than 12 tonnes, or a fatigue-regulated bus, as defined by section 7 of the HVNL.

Read more about the Standard here:

A National Operating Standard Policy

A National Operating Standard Policy

National Operating Standard Policy cover

Case Study - Phased Roll Out Of Mandatory Telematics For Operators Within The Heavy Vehicle National Law

Case Study - Phased Roll Out Of Mandatory Telematics For Operators Within The Heavy Vehicle National Law

A National Operating Standard Fact Sheet

A National Operating Standard Fact Sheet

Making Safety Management Systems Compulsory

Making Safety Management Systems Compulsory

Making safety management systems compulsory cover